Participatory democracy demands low-energy technology, and free people must travel the road to productive social relations at the speed of a bicycle. – Ivan Illich, Energy and Equity

Man on a bicycle can go three or four times faster than the pedestrian, but uses five times less energy in the process. – Ivan Illich, Energy and Equity

Small brain: How many cars can we move?

Big brain: How many people can we move?

Galactic brain: Why do we need to move people? Put their daily needs close at hand.

– Jeff Speck, @JeffSpeckAICP

“All truly great thoughts are conceived while walking.” – Friedrich Nietzsche

“Increasing road width to reduce congestion is the same as loosening your belt to fight obesity.” – Lewis Mumford

“We want to house people, not cars. I hope that other cities notice that when Oakland did this revolutionary, radical thing, which includes zero parking requirements in downtown, as well as a parking cap–not just a minimum, but an actual maximum–these radical, dangerous ideas actually flew through our city council approval process without any controversy.” […]

“You can have a city that is friendly to cars, or friendly to people, but you cannot have both.” —Enrique Penalosa

“When a road is once built, it is a strange thing how it collects traffic.” —Robert Louis Stevenson

“If traffic speeds and volumes are high, don’t mitigate with separated bikeways or whatever, try to reduce those speeds and volumes.” —Michael Ronkin

So if you forced me to have a federal transportation bill, then I would want it to do two things. First, I would want it to place a moratorium on the expansion, extension or construction of any new auto-oriented facilities. No new road miles anywhere. There is no need for this country to ever build another mile, another lane, another overpass or anything — we have far more than we can take care of now, most of it very unproductive. I would make this exception, however: any state that wants a new mile of highway has to remove two miles of existing. This would allow flexibility for states that wanted a strategic contraction, allowing them to allocate scarce resources to areas that would have the greatest benefit. In short, I would ensure the bill funded maintenance (which would make it politically irrelevant in the current context, but that is beside the point).” –Chuck Marohn, Strong Towns